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World Malaria Day 2011

  • World Malaria Day - which was instituted by the World Health Assembly at its 60th session in May 2007 - is a day that recognises the global effort to provide effective control of malaria. The day is commemorated every year on April 25 to create awareness about an ancient disease and the devastating impact it has on the lives of more than 3 billion people.
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    World Malaria Day - which was instituted by the World Health Assembly at its 60th session in May 2007 - is a day that recognises the global effort to provide effective control of malaria. The day is commemorated every year on April 25 to create awareness about an ancient disease and the devastating impact it has on the lives of more than 3 billion people.

  • Malaria is a parasitic disease characterised by high fever, chills and rigors accompanied by headache, nausea and vomiting, muscle pain and anaemia. The disease is a major health problem in India as in most of the tropics and subtropics.
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    Malaria is a parasitic disease characterised by high fever, chills and rigors accompanied by headache, nausea and vomiting, muscle pain and anaemia. The disease is a major health problem in India as in most of the tropics and subtropics.

  • Avoid mosquito bites by wearing protective clothing over the arms and legs, using mosquito nets and screens, and insect repellents (cream, lotion, spray or vaporizer).
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    Avoid mosquito bites by wearing protective clothing over the arms and legs, using mosquito nets and screens, and insect repellents (cream, lotion, spray or vaporizer).

  • Anti-malarial drugs can be prescribed for visitors to areas where malaria is prevalent. Treatment should begin two weeks before entering the area, and continued for 4 weeks after leaving the area.
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    Anti-malarial drugs can be prescribed for visitors to areas where malaria is prevalent. Treatment should begin two weeks before entering the area, and continued for 4 weeks after leaving the area.

  • Sleep in rooms that are properly screened with gauze over the windows and doors. There should be no holes in the gauze and no unscreened entry points to the room. Air-conditioned rooms are good, too.
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    Sleep in rooms that are properly screened with gauze over the windows and doors. There should be no holes in the gauze and no unscreened entry points to the room. Air-conditioned rooms are good, too.

  • Wear light colours while going out afternoon as light colours are less attractive to mosquitoes.
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    Wear light colours while going out afternoon as light colours are less attractive to mosquitoes.

  • Use bednets when sleeping in areas infested with mosquitoes.
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    Use bednets when sleeping in areas infested with mosquitoes.

  • Use insecticides and flying insect sprays to reduce the number of mosquitoes in areas where you will be spending a significant amount of time.
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    Use insecticides and flying insect sprays to reduce the number of mosquitoes in areas where you will be spending a significant amount of time.

  • When possible, avoid camping or spending prolonged amounts of time in areas where standing water is present.
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    When possible, avoid camping or spending prolonged amounts of time in areas where standing water is present.

  • Keep pots and pans emptied of water. Open vessels for drinking water should be covered. Mosquitoes use areas of standing water to lay their eggs.
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    Keep pots and pans emptied of water. Open vessels for drinking water should be covered. Mosquitoes use areas of standing water to lay their eggs.

  • If you know you will be traveling in areas where malaria is prevalent, ask your doctor for antimalarial drugs.
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    If you know you will be traveling in areas where malaria is prevalent, ask your doctor for antimalarial drugs.

  • Pregnant women should avoid travelling to malarious regions as it increases the risk of abortion, premature birth, still-birth and maternal death.
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    Pregnant women should avoid travelling to malarious regions as it increases the risk of abortion, premature birth, still-birth and maternal death.

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