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Home »  Diabetes »  Poorly Controlled Diabetes Can Lead To Heart Failure, Researchers Warn

Poorly Controlled Diabetes Can Lead To Heart Failure, Researchers Warn

Here's another reason why diabetics need to control their condition. Diabetes has been found to be a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and this eventually leads to blockage of coronary arteries, researchers have warned.

Poorly Controlled Diabetes Can Lead To Heart Failure, Researchers Warn

Diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure: study

Heart problems are a common development for people with diabetes and now researchers have found that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population.

According to health expert in India, if poorly controlled, diabetes leads to cardiomyopathy resulting in progressive deterioration of pumping capacity of heart.

"Diabetes is also a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and this eventually leads to blockage of coronary arteries. This leads to heart attack or myocardial infarction," Satish Koul, HOD and Director Internal Medicine, Narayana Superspeciality Hospital, Gurugram, told IANS.


"Due to myocardial infarction, the heart muscle becomes weak and eventually heart fails as a pump leading to congestive heart failure," Koul added.

According to the current study, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers evaluated the long-term impact of diabetes on the development of heart failure, both with preserved ejection fraction - a measurement of the percentage of blood leaving the heart with each contraction - and reduced ejection fraction.

They also looked at mortality in a community population, controlling for hypertension, coronary artery disease and diastolic function.

From an initial group of 2,042 residents of Olmsted County in US, 116 study participants with diabetes were matched 1:2 for age, hypertension, sex, coronary artery disease and diastolic dysfunction to 232 participants without diabetes.

Over the 10-year follow-up period, 21 per cent of participants with diabetes developed heart failure, independent of other causes.

In comparison, only 12 per cent of patients without diabetes developed heart failure. Cardiac death, heart attack and stroke were not statistically different in the study between the two groups.

The study shows that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population.

Furthermore, the outcome data support the concept of a diabetic cardiomyopathy.

This research extends previous findings and demonstrates that even without a known cardiac structural abnormality and with a normal ejection fraction, diabetic patients are still at increased risk of developing heart failure as compared to their nondiabetic counterparts.

"The key takeaway is that diabetes mellitus alone is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure," said study senior author Horng Chen from Mayo Clinic in the US.

"Our hope is that this study provides a strong foundation for further investigations into diabetes and heart failure. There is still much to learn and study in terms of this association and how to best diagnose and treat this condition," Chen added.

How to keep diabetes under control?

Diabetes can be controlled by not just taking medicines on time and regular monitoring of blood sugar levels, but also by eating a healthy diet and following a healthy lifestyle. Following are some tips that can help in keeping diabetes and blood sugar under control:

1. Maintain a healthy weight: Weight management is an important part of diabetes control. Being overweight increases risks of type 2 diabetes.

2. Consume less carbs: Eating refined carbs can be bad for people with diabetes as they lead to a rapid increase in blood sugar levels. Junk food, deep fried food, processed and packaged food and sugary foods must all be avoided by people with diabetes. Eat more fibre-rich foods as they can prevent sudden spike in blood sugar levels.

3. Include strength training in your routine: People with diabetes must do strength training or weight training regularly as it helps in improving body's insulin response. Regular practice of strength training can prevent onset of diabetes.


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4. Opt for foods with low glycaemic index: Studies have shown that eating low glycemic index foods can reduce long-term blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

5. Take less stress: Stress can be more harmful than you can imagine for diabetics. Stress results in release of hormones like glucagon and cortisol. This can result in a spike in blood sugar levels and make it difficult to control diabetes.



(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)
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