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Hugh Jackman Treated For Cancer Again

Hollywood actor Hugh Jackman was recently treated again for Basal Cell Carcinoma, he tweeted, with a picture from a hospital showing a bandage on his nose. The 48-year-old actor has been treated for skin cancer four times before. On Twitter, the Wolverine actor revealed that the cancer is under control and posted a warning to wear sunscreen: "Another basal cell carcinoma. Thanks to frequent checks & amazing doctors, all's well. Looks worse w the dressing on then off! WEARSUNSCREEN (sic)."

 Hugh Jackman Treated For Cancer Again

Skin Cancer is treatable if detected early.

Hollywood actor Hugh Jackman was recently treated again for Basal Cell Carcinoma, he tweeted, with a picture from a hospital showing a bandage on his nose. The 48-year-old actor has been treated for skin cancer four times before. On Twitter, the Wolverine actor revealed that the cancer is under control and posted a warning to wear sunscreen: "Another basal cell carcinoma. Thanks to frequent checks & amazing doctors, all's well. Looks worse w the dressing on then off! WEARSUNSCREEN (sic).

Basal cell carcinoma appears as a change in the skin, such as a growth or a sore that won't heal. These changes in the skin, or lesions have one of the following characteristics:

  • A pearly white, skin-colored or pink bump that is translucent. In people with darker skin tones, the lesion would be darker but still somewhat translucent. The most common type of basal cell carcinoma, this lesion often appears on the face, ears or neck.
  • A brown, black or blue lesion or a lesion with dark spots with a slightly raised, translucent border.
  • A flat, scaly, reddish patch with a raised edge is more common on the back or chest. Over time, these patches can grow quite large.
  • A white, waxy, scar-like lesion without a clearly defined border, called morpheaform basal cell carcinoma, is the least common. This lesion is easy to overlook, but it may be a sign of a particularly invasive and disfiguring cancer.


Factors that increase your risk of basal cell carcinoma include:

  • A lot of time spent in the sun increases the risk of basal cell carcinoma. The threat is greater if you live in a sunny or high-altitude location, both of which expose you to more UV radiation. Severe sunburn, especially during childhood or adolescence, also increases your risk.
  • Radiation therapy to treat psoriasis, acne or other skin conditions may increase the risk of basal cell carcinoma at previous treatment sites on the skin.
  • The risk of basal cell carcinoma is higher among people who freckle or burn easily or who have very light skin, red or blond hair, or light-colored eyes.
  • Men are more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma than women.
  • Because basal cell carcinoma often takes decades to develop, the majority of basal cell carcinomas occur after age 50.
  • A personal or family history of skin cancer. If you've had basal cell carcinoma one or more times, you have a good chance of developing it again. If you have a family history of skin cancer, you may have an increased risk of developing basal cell carcinoma.
  • Inherited syndromes that cause skin cancer. Certain rare genetic diseases often result in basal cell carcinoma.


A number of treatments are available for basal cell carcinoma. What treatment is best for you depends on the type, location and size of your cancer, as well as your preferences and ability to do follow-up visits. Treatment selection can also depend on whether this is a first-time or recurring basal cell carcinoma. Surgery is the most common and the simplest way to treat skin cancer. The affected area along with some of the surrounding normal tissue is removed. If the cancer has spread to other areas, chemotherapy may be required. In this, the cancer cells are destroyed with the help of anti-cancer drugs. Treatment usually does not have many after-effects and skin cancer is the most treatable of all cancers if detected early. It usually does not spread into other areas, but even if it does, removal usually protects against recurrence.

Disclaimer: This content including advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.

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