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Tips For Parents Who Have A Child With Autism

Do not treat your kid like an outsider, make them feel at peace with themselves. There are certain things that your kid might have wished you knew about their condition.

Tips For Parents Who Have A Child With Autism

Help your autistic kids by making them feel comfortable and secure

HIGHLIGHTS

  1. Give them plain and direct instructions
  2. Their senses are not in sync and are painfully enhanced
  3. Your body language and expressions also matter when you talk to them
Autism is tough to handle, but it is not impossible for an autistic person to have an amazing life. A parent who has an autistic child has to deal with so much that somewhere down the process they forget that it is the child with the problems not them. Do not treat your kid like an outsider, make them feel at peace with themselves. There are certain things that your kid might have wished you knew about their condition. Read below on how to handle and improve the life of your autistic child.

Hypersensitivity - The most important thing we need to realize is that their senses are not in sync at all. The same smells and sights which might appear beautiful and magnificent to us could be unbearable for them. Their hearing may even be hyper acute, and noisy places are nothing short of a hell hole for them. These enhanced senses can be quite painful for them. Remember they experience the world in a lot different way than you, so adjust accordingly.

Abstract Language - Well to be honest no one likes bad puns, but a study has proven that people with autism have trouble connecting with metaphors and similes. They do not understand the innuendo behind certain phrases and are prone to understand the literal level of every sentence. Make sure that you give them plain and direct instructions, it's not that they deliberately want to disobey you, they just can't understand.

Plain Instructions - Avoid at all costs any complex instruction you might think about giving them. Plus remember, it might get frustrating for you, but for them it can be downright painful and aloof. Keep everything simple and plain for them. Plus, your body language and expressions also matter. Just because they have trouble understanding what you want doesn't mean that they don't understand your interaction with them.

Social interactions - Don't assume that an autistic child will always be an introvert. It's not their choice, but rather an outcome of their situation. With acute and painfully enhanced senses, problem with crowded places and trouble in having conversations it's no surprise that they avoid social instructions. It becomes your imperative responsibility that you make them feel as comfortable as possible. Accept them, help them adapt and lastly achieve a sense of unity and love with them.

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