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How to handle febrile convulsions in a child?

Q: My son is now 7 months old (completed). His Weight is 8.75 Kgs. He used to have mild fits with fever. The first attack occurred with high fever with DPT dose. After that he was given DT. We are giving him phenobarbitone 30 mg (1.5 tablets daily) started early this year as prescribed by the neurologist. His CT Scan is normal. A week ago he had high fever and phlegm and was prescribed Amoxycillin and Soonil Suspension for fever. Now he has recovered completely but every 2 or 3 days, when he wakes up from sleep, he shows very mild fit-like symptoms which last for a second and occur in repeated intervals for 5 to 10 minutes. The baby is not showing any physical disturbance and is in a happy mood. What may be the cause of this? Is it due to the climate and heat wave which is around 46 Degrees in Delhi? We are using coolers 24 hours a day.

A:It appears that your son had FEBRILE CONVULSIONS that started at a very young age (less than 6 months). Febrile convulsions are a common problem that affect about 3% of all children born. Most such children do not have any problem (fits) later on in life. Some children (those having first febrile convulsion before the age of 6 months, those having neurological abnormality, those with prolonged or recurrent febrile convulsions and those with a family history of convulsions) are at a risk to develop recurrent febrile convulsions and also convulsions without fever later on in life. It appears that your son has had recurrent febrile convulsions and also seizures (the minor fits that you have described) without fever (epilepsy). Phenobarbitone is not the drug of choice for treating such children since it is associated with certain side effects and now better drugs are available. The present climate in Delhi probably has nothing to do with your childs problems. It is suggested that you should get your child evaluated by some experienced EPILEPTOLOGIST who will be able to not only help in treating his problem but also provide you with expert opinion with regard to your son's long term outcome. Since your child d is otherwise normal, it appears that he should have a good outcome.

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