Home » Frequently asked Questions on Health » Why am I feeling weak a month after jaundice?

Why am I feeling weak a month after jaundice?

Q: I am a 30-year-old male weighing 85 kg and height 177 cm. I was diagnosed with jaundice (indirect bilirubin-1.6 and direct bilirubin-normal) a month ago with other symptoms like feeling tired and breathless on exertion, etc. My ALT also was found to be a little higher than normal. Hepatitis B and C tests were negative. I took rest at home for three weeks and was on a no-oil, no-pulses / legumes, no fat, boiled water diet. Along with this I had problems with gas formation in stomach. I was taking Omez, Mucaine, Liv-52, Silybon and Riconia. I rejoined office last week, but am still feeling very weak and tired, especially when I laugh out loud, am angry or walk / climb stairs. I also feel pain in my left side near the nipple or on the sides near to arms. What is wrong with me? The doctor said it is all because of the viral Hepatitis I had and related anxiety. He conducted an ECG, but the report was normal. Kindly advise.

A:Viral hepatitis is caused by five main types of viruses, though there are some other types as well:

  • Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is spread through water and food and can affect anyone, ranging from isolated cases of disease to widespread epidemics.
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes a serious disease, which in some cases can cause lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure and even death.
  • Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is found in the blood of persons who have the disease.
  • Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a defective virus that needs the hepatitis B virus to exist.
  • Hepatitis E virus (HEV) usually causes a self-limiting infection except in pregnant females, in whom it can be quite serious, and is transmitted in the same way as hepatitis A virus. HBV, HCV and HDV are transmitted by blood and body fluids, whereas HAV and HEV are water/food borne infections.
In your case, you most likely had HAV or HEV infection, which will settle down on its own over time. Stop worrying about it, but do avoid alcohol.

RELATED FAQ

................... Advertisement ...................

   

FAQ

ASK OUR EXPERTS

Using 0 of 1024 Possible characters
Choose Topic
-------------------------------- Advertisement -----------------------------------