ASK OUR EXPERTS

Choose Topic
Using 0 of 1024 Possible characters
Home »  News »  Eating disorder may not stunt growth

Eating disorder may not stunt growth

Adolescent girls with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa may reach normal height on recovering from the disease.

Eating disorder may not stunt growth

Adolescent girls with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa may reach normal height on recovering from the disease. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterised by low body weight and an obsessive fear of gaining weight. Girls with anorexia are known to control body weight through means of voluntary starvation, purging, vomiting, excessive exercise, or other weight control measures, such as diet pills. Studies on the impact of anorexia on growth and stature have yielded mixed results. Some suggest that anorexia causes short stature, while other research suggests that girls with this condition may reach their full height potential, or even be taller than average. During normal puberty, levels of growth hormone and insulin like growth hormone rise, triggering a growth spurt. This process of growth and bone aging is delayed in girls with anorexia, giving them a chance to reach their full potential height after they recover. So, to investigate the relation between anorexia nervosa and height, American researchers examined 208 girls: 110 with anorexia nervosa and 98 controls of comparable chronological age. Sixty-three girls with anorexia nervosa and 79 controls were followed prospectively over 1 year. The participants were aged between 12 and 18 years. The researchers estimated the girls' potential adult height based on the heights of their parents. It was found that girls who had been sick for 32 months or longer were shorter than average, while those who had the condition for at least 30 months had a lower-than-average predicted adult heights. Among girls with anorexia who hadn't yet reached puberty, a greater delay in bone aging was linked to faster growth during follow-up. However, growth may be permanently stunted in girls who suffer from anorexia for longer than about 2.5 years. Long-term, larger studies are required to further investigate whether girls with more severe anorexia and those who have had the condition for a longer time are indeed at greater risk of stunted growth.
Pediatrics
June 2008
COMMENT

DoctorNDTV is the one stop site for all your health needs providing the most credible health information, health news and tips with expert advice on healthy living, diet plans, informative videos etc. You can get the most relevant and accurate info you need about health problems like diabetes, cancer, pregnancy, HIV and AIDS, weight loss and many other lifestyle diseases. We have a panel of over 350 experts who help us develop content by giving their valuable inputs and bringing to us the latest in the world of healthcare.

Was this Article Helpful Yes or No

................... Advertisement ...................

................... Advertisement ...................

FAQ

ASK OUR EXPERTS

Using 0 of 1024 Possible characters
Choose Topic

................... Advertisement ...................

-------------------------------- Advertisement -----------------------------------