ASK OUR EXPERTS

Choose Topic
Using 0 of 1024 Possible characters
Home »  Heart »  Don't Want To Risk A Heart Attack? Avoid Taking Painkillers Regularly

Don't Want To Risk A Heart Attack? Avoid Taking Painkillers Regularly

Using commonly prescribed painkillers such as ibuprofen and diclofenac for just a week can increase the risk of a heart attack by up to 50 per cent, a new study warns.

Don't Want To Risk A Heart Attack? Avoid Taking Painkillers Regularly

Using commonly prescribed painkillers such as ibuprofen and diclofenac for just a week can increase the risk of a heart attack by up to 50 per cent, a new study warns.

According to the study, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain and inflammation could be raising risk of having a heart attack as early as in the first week of use and especially within the first month of taking high doses of such medication.

Researchers, led by Michele Bally of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) in Canada, set out to characterize the risks of heart attack associated with use of oral NSAIDs under real life practice circumstances. They carried out a review of relevant studies from various healthcare databases including those from Canada, Finland and the UK. They analysed results on 446,763 people of whom 61,460 had a heart attack. The NSAIDs of interest to the researchers were celecoxib, the three main traditional NSAIDs (diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen), and rofecoxib. Researchers presented their results as probabilities of having a heart attack. They looked at various scenarios corresponding to how people might routinely use these drugs. The study found that taking any dose of NSAIDs for one week, one month, or more than a month was associated with an increased risk of heart attack.

Naproxen was associated with the same risk of heart attack as that documented for other NSAIDs. With celecoxib, the risk was lower than for rofecoxib and was comparable to that of traditional NSAIDs. Overall the increase in risk of a heart attack is about 20 to 50 per cent if using NSAIDs compared with not using these medications.


Further analysis suggested that the risk of heart attack associated with NSAID use was greatest with higher doses and during the first month of use. With longer treatment duration, risk did not seem to continue to increase but the researchers caution that they did not study repeat heart attacks such that it remains prudent to use NSAIDs for as short time as possible.

(With inputs from PTI)
painkillers heart disease
Was this Article Helpful Yes or No

................... Advertisement ...................

Q&A

ASK OUR EXPERTS

Using 0 of 1024 Possible characters
Choose Topic

Latest stories

Your Job Can Make You Vitamin D Deficient

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 17:06:46 IST
Deficiency in vitamin D can lead to various adverse health conditions such as metabolic disorders, psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, and cancer.

Gigantic Egg Shaped Cyst Removed From A Woman's Brain

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 14:16:26 IST
In a rare and challenging brain surgery, doctors from Asian Institute of Medical sciences situated in Faridabad successfully removed an 'egg-shaped' foreign object from the brain of 41-year-old Shanti Devi.

Breastfeeding Can Save You From Deadly Heart Attacks And Stroke

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:22:08 IST
A recent study has shown that breastfeeding can lower the risk of acquiring heart related problems by 10 % and aids the body's metabolic process in re-setting the mother's body back to normalcy

Check Your Blood Group! You Could Be At Risk Of A Heart Disease

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:03:55 IST
According to researchers, some blood group types are at a higher risk of suffering from coronary heart disease.

Being A Father At an Old Age Can Be Advantageous

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 13:50:16 IST
This study published in Translational Psychiatry suggests that children who have older fathers may have certain advantages over their peers in educational and career settings.